Shorty

I recently received an email offering me samples of Rubik’s Revolution, an electronic version of the Rubik’s Cube as well as an electronic pocket-sized version of the popular game show Are You Smarter Than A Fifth Grader? I told them not to send the Rubick’s Cube because I am in still in therapy from when it came out the first time in the 80s.  Between the Rubiks Cube and Pac Man, the 80s were really stressful for me.  I am not wired to do those kinds of things.

But! I love the game show Jeopardy! and so I figured I would like the Are You Smarter Than a Fifth Grader? game. And I do, even though I am not.  I’m not even smarter than my 4-year-old most of the time.

If you think you would like to have one of these little gadgets and have a US mailing address, leave a comment on this post before midnight on Sunday, telling me your dad’s first name (or your favorite dad-type person) and some fun factoid about him.  I’ll randomly select a winner or just whomever I like the best.  KIDDING! I’m just messin’ with y’all.  Monday I will email the winner.

I’ll go first.

My dad’s name is Ed, but anyone who really knows him calls him Shorty.  When I was growing up, the family across the street had a scruffy little dog named Shorty and sometimes that would get confusing when they opened the screen door and hollered for the dog to come home. Oh, and my dad makes the best boiled hotdog ever. I should know. He made me one for lunch every single day the year I went to kindergarten.  Every. Day.

Happy Father’s Day everyone!

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Edited to add:  I am loving your comments y’all – it just blesses me to read this treasure trove of tiny stories. If you have a blog, or even if you don’t, I hope you will consider expanding your comment into an essay or short story for future generations.

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And the winner is….. Natalie!  Natalie, look for an email from me with further instructions on how to claim your fabulous prize!

158 thoughts on “Shorty

  1. I read every single one. Thanks for sharing the memories of all your fathers. I think this is an exceptionally blessed group!

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  2. I was out of town and missed the contest 😦 , but like Holly, I want to mention my daddy too.
    His name was James and he put himself through college in the depression – became a minister who preached for over 65 years. He was the warmest, most loving man I ever knew. I sat in his lap every morning until I married – then I would sit in his lap when I visited his home. The last time I sat in his lap, he was 92 and getting frail. He asked me if I were one of his – I told him yes and he asked which one I was. I told him Beth and he said “I guess it is okay for you to sit in my lap then.”

    A funny fact about my dad was discovered after he died and I was going through his correspondence. I discovered a letter from the governor of Alabama addressed to my dad in 1949 – thanking him for his letter and the suggestion to make mechanical turn signals a requirement for motor vehicles in the state. The governor said he had forwarded his letter on to the department of motor vehicles. That was my dad 🙂

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  3. I know it’s too late for the contest, but I wanted to write out some memories of my Daddy anyway. His name is Ric, and when I was growing up he was a DJ on the radio. My friends thought that was pretty cool. He does a fabulous duck voice. He wrote a song for my wedding, and he and my mom sang it during the ceremony. He used to be in a country band, was the lead singer with long hair… now he has very little hair! He must be going through a mid life crisis, b/c last year he bought a Harley and got 3 tattoos! When I was about 10, my sister and I bet him that he couldn’t do a cartwheel and he did one right in the parking lot of our favorite pizza place!! His dad was murdered when my dad was about the age of my son, so he grew up without a dad. He had two daughters, and now is enjoying his grandsons (4 of them) and 2 sweet granddaughters, who all call him Pop. I love my dad!

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  4. My dad’s middle name is Alfred, and he always just signed A. for his middle initial because he didn’t like it. He is a wonderful Christian example and has a great sense of humor. He added the laughter to our home, and I can remember company sitting around the kitchen table with everyone laughing at my dad’s stories and funny ways of saying things. My sister is blessed with this easy humor, too. My dad is not well now. I have been blessed with a great father. We have all been blessed with an even more awesome Heavenly Father. I am glad your blog honors God. I am so sad when I have read blogs that do not honor Him, and I don’t read those again.

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  5. My Dad’s name is Theo, he is a math teacher and a programmer. When I was little, he got his first computer- an old commodore 64, with those black screens with green letters on it. My Dad said that they would become the future one day and everyone would have one on their desks. He tried to put me behind it, but since you couldn’t even really type anything, because there was no backspace or delete, I didn’t see the fun of it.

    Then my Dad stayed up working a few nights and days, and one day he brought me back to it and said ‘meet your new friend!’. The computer now had a face, made up out of parenthesis and 0’s. He had made this program and it asked me for my name, which I had to type in. It asked me to be its friend. And then… it continued to ask me all these math problems! When I tried to quit, it asked me if I still wanted to be it’s friend.. I got pretty good at Math that year.

    Fast forward 25 years, I went to college and became a programmer myself and now I program educational software for little kids, much like my Dad did that day for me. He always sparked my imagination, and not only let me dream, but also allowed for my dreams to come true when he spent most of his savings on my college education. I owe my creativity, my career and my happiness to my Dad.

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  6. My dad’s name was Clyde, he had a great laugh and used it often.

    When he was little his parents called him Jr. so when he went off to school he did not know he needed to answer to Clyde when the teacher called him.
    Wish he were here to take my sons fishing and tell us all his funny stories. Looking forward to seeing him on the other side of the river, up by Beulah land.

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  7. My dad’s name was Harold, and he was a GREAT story teller. He was normally out hunting or fishing on Saturday mornings when I was a kid, but when he was home, he would watch Bugs Bunny with us and laugh harder than any one of us kids. I laughed more at him than at the cartoons.

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  8. My dad’s name is Dave. He is a great dad. One year his summer job was working with a carnival running the Ferris Wheel. Hearing about that is a favorite family story.

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  9. I’m lucky enough to have had 2 dads – my dad dad was Michael. He was great at telling jokes and loved, loved, loved baseball. He died a few months before I got married more than 10 years ago. I miss him terribly. My (step) dad is Tom – he joined my family when I was in 9th grade – he missed diapers, but was lucky enough to catch me right in time for the tween years (even though that name had not been given to them yet!). I thank God that he stuck around! We named our son Thomas, in his honor.

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  10. My dad’s name is Charles – but most people call him Chuck. We call him Papa. My 7 year old son is currently with Papa way far off in Wisconsin, visiting my grandfather. I know they are making memories but i am afraid Ian will come home totally spoiled!

    Thanks for the great giveaway!

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  11. Moleta says:
    My dad’s name was Spencer Newton Lankford. Some called him Spence, Newt or Slim (I wish I had taken after that “slim” side of my family. This is my 20th Father’s Day without him, and it is still hard. Memories have just flooded my mind when I started reading these comments. 1st- I used to get nose bleeds all the time. One day, we were expecting company, so we were cleaning house, making homemade ice cream and my nose started bleeding. Mom called daddy at work. He said he would bring home gift for me. He rode in a car pool, and I was watching for him. He gets out with this big burlap sack. In it were 7 Bantum chickens. I loved those miniature chickens for a long time. (But I didn’t understand the connection between nose bleeds and chickens. 2nd-We lived out in the country. The drive in theater was just up the highway from our house, They always put on a big fireworks show on July 4th. We would buy firecrackers and have family & friends over for food and fun. Daddy was setting off our fireworks and he had some Roman candles in his back pocket. A spark lit them, and I never saw my daddy move so fast. He wasn’t hurt, but it sure changed how we did fireworks. 3rd and last memory- We had a big barn with a hay loft. One summer Daddy decided he wanted to build a boat. He knew it would take him awhile, so he didn’t want to build it outside. He moved all his wood and tools to the hay loft. For 2 or 3 years, he worked on that BIG BOAT. When it was finished, he realized he couldn’t get it out of the loft. When we moved away from the farm, the boat was still in the hay loft. Some farmer sure got a surprise! Thanks for this opportunity to share. Moleta

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  12. My dad’s name was Ernest. He was born in Kansas in 1919 (he was 47 when I was born!), in a Mennonite family, and grew up speaking German. He didn’t learn English till he started school at age 6! He met my mother in Ethiopia, and by the time I knew him, he could speak 6 languages. He lived all over the world, but he loved people. I was only 15 when he died, but my brothers’ friends (much older than I) commented on how he was a person they felt they could come to with problems and questions. I have memories of the house filled with teenage and college age boys, talking to my dad. (This when I was too young to appreciate my luck 😉

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  13. My dad’s name is Jim Jones. But not the Jim Jones that everyone thinks of. My dad got out of the Navy to raise me after his and my mom’s divorce because she gave up custody. My dad used to dress me in a flannel button down shirt, overalls, and plow boots everyday until he met my step-mom, then he dressed me in pink from head to toe! I was 2yrs old when he took over as full time dad. He and my mom (step-mom) has given me a whole life that my real mother could have never given to me.

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  14. My dad’s name is Floyd.
    My grandma tells the story of when he was 3 and they were at church. Next thing she knew, dad had crawled under the pews all the way to the front of the church and she had to go get him. When he was in high school, he was in the band. He had to quit though because he couldn’t march and play at the same time.

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  15. My dad’s name is Robert. He was a busy man when I was a child but he always made time for fun.
    We would go to a drive through restaraunt and he would tell the cashier our order. Only he would leave out every other word. (I …Like to ….Cheese…..) Anyway, I know it sounds cruel to mess with the poeple at the drive through but he could do it perfectly and he would never laugh to let them know what was going on.
    My dad is my best friend and a wonderful person.

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  16. My dad’s name is Charles Bernard…named after his dad and it’s also my brother’s name. Bernard, Charles, and Charlie 🙂

    My dad is a great man…always willing to above and beyond the call of duty for anyone in his path 🙂

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  17. My Dad’s name was John Joseph James. My Mom called him Jack, his aunts Johnny and his father Sonny. Confusing? He tried to be a handyman :0 when we were little he started building a boat — exciting stuff when you are 10. We made the back of the boat — and even named it. The project ended there. Years later we were cleaning out Moms house and there was the boat! My brother still has it hanging in his garage.

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  18. My dad was known as Mouse in high school. Him and my mom started dating when they were freshmen, so she became Mrs. Mouse. I always thought that was so cute! I love my dad so much! He’s got an awesome sense of humor and has instilled in me a GREAT love of the Andy Griffith Show! I watch an episode every night before bed!

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  19. My Dad’s name is Harold.
    His Dad immigrated to Canada from Scotland when he was young. My Dad was born in Canada, and after my Dad’s Dad passed away the family had no contact with the family back in Scotland. My Dad never knew any of his relatives on his Dad’s side. That is until a cousin living in England posted an add in our local newspaper about 15-20 years ago looking for any relatives of my Dad’s Dad. She wanted to re-connect with anyone she could find but all she knew was the name of our city where Grandpa had moved as a young man. Years later, my parents still have a wonderful relationship with Dad’s cousin June in England. They exchange photos, letters, and call each other.

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  20. My dad’s name is Charles. He’s been called many names over the years, from “Boy” and “Chots” in his youth, to “Lietuenant” and “Medic!” in his Army days, to “Charlie” and “Daddy” when we children were younger, and now “Daddo” to his grandchildren.

    He’s a spontaneous, fun-loving man who likes nothing better than to throw a suitcase into the car and go on a trip. Anywhere, anytime. To see the fall foliage in New England, to ride a surrey on the boardwalk at the Jersey Shore, to walk the hallowed grounds of Gettysburg, or stand where the Wright Brothers flew their plane at Kill Devil Hills — we kids got to see the USA and learn about its history the very best way: with our eyes and ears and fingers and feelings.

    When we turned 16, he took each of us to Europe for two or three weeks, to do the Grand Tour: England, France, Monaco, Germany, Switzerland, Italy. We traveled to some of the major cities of the Old World, to help us appreciate the cultures that created the New World.

    Now that we are older still and each have our own children, Dad has written books of his memoirs and made tapes of his memories, so that we know where *we* came from, specifically. They are an invaluable treasure, those memories.

    Better yet, he has helped to spearhead a drive to videotape American veterans telling their stories, so that each surviving veteran has a chance to be heard. With an average of 1,800 veterans dying every day, Dad knows that he can’t possibly capture all of them on tape.

    On the other hand, I don’t think the word “impossible” is in Dad’s vocabulary….

    Dad helped to make us who we are, and he helped us to understand why we are who we are.

    Happy Father’s Day, Dad. You are still The Greatest.

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  21. My daddy’s name is Ricky. He is a smart, quiet, patient man. He’s really good at fixing things. His older sister told me that when he and my uncle were younger, my uncle would take things apart and my father would put them back together again.

    He is such a great dad; he has three girls and all of us are “Daddy’s girls”. We are so blessed.

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  22. My dad’s first name is Rogers (with an “s”). This always throws people. They all want to call him Roger. I remember one time after we had moved to a new town I went with my mom to the telephone company to have our new phone hooked up. When it came time to tell the woman my dad’s name she asked, “Rogers, with an s?” and my mom said, “Yes.” She asked “Why?” and without missing a beat my mom replied, “I don’t know, maybe at one time there were two of them!”

    One quirky thing my dad always does that used to really bug me is he never says goodbye at the end of a phone conversation. He just hangs up!

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  23. Well, I cannot be entered into your contest as I have a Canadian address – but wanted to share anyway.

    My dad’s name is James Donald. He goes by Don. He has 13 brothers and sisters. Two of his sister’s married a Don – so my dad goes by “Legit Donald”.

    My favorite story is when he had a contest with his brothers on who could make the highest stilts. My dad strapped all the 2X4’s that he could find together and stepped off the barn roof. And promptly fell face first on the ground.

    He won. And he has the scar over his eye to prove it.
    I love that story!

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  24. My dad’s name was Wren. He served during World War II in the South Pacific, caught “yellow fever” and malaria and came home with a whole lot less hair. He was mostly bald all my life with cornflower blue eyes and a ready smile and I thought he was the most handsome man. He had a soft spot for animals of any kind, loved children (good thing – there were 5 of us)and enjoyed building things. He teased us unmercifully and always had a joke or two to share. He worked hard as a feed salesman and later a marketing director to provide for our large family. He is now “face to face” but we were blessed to have him around for 73 years. Happy Father’s Day to all the great Dads out there!

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  25. My Dad was Ratliff Ferdinand.He was named after his Grandpa.He was born 1909 and his Grandpa Ferd was born in 1846.My fathers nickname was Rat.I would hate a nickname like that,but he didn’t seem to mind.
    He was a farmer in North Florida.He had 3 daughters,I’m the third daughter ,then 3 sets of twins.Two boys,a boy and a girl then two girls.I was six years old when my mom had the last set of twins.The names-Donald,Ronald,Curtis,Myrtice,Linda,Glenda.NO JOKE!

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  26. My daddy’s name was John, but his mama called him “John Thomas,” because as we all know, mama’s sometimes need more than one syllable for effect when calling their children hither.

    Daddy died too young, but not before he married his bride, served in the Army, raised 4 children, built about a million miles of pipeline at the end of a welding rod, and loved on his grandbabies.

    I suspect he’s up in heaven rocking the babies and telling Jesus the same old story, over and over and over. I can just hear Jesus: “John Thomas, I heard this one already!”

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  27. My dad’s name was Mike. He was very smart, looked a bit like Ed Harris, worked hard, volunteered everywhere, was at church every time the doors were open, was quick with a smile, never met a stranger, could fix anything, loved kids, got me hooked on cryptograms & Sudoku, loved playing board games & cards with us, told great stories & jokes, pitched softball for our church team every year, loved going on short term mission trips, taught me how to ride a bike and bowl and waterski and drive. I could go on, but I’ll stop there. God promoted him to Heaven last year very unexpectedly. I miss him so much it still hurts.

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  28. My father’s name was Wint, short for Winton. He was named for the doctor who saved his father’s life. Apparently, he had some strange condition where his stomach filled up with pus (sorry for the gorry details) and when the doctor lanced him, it shot all the way up to the ceiling. My father used to laugh when he told the story while the rest of us sat around gagging.

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  29. My dad, Jim, is a very musical guy. He has a wonderful singing voice, plays trumpet and keyboard, and has been involved in many choirs and other musical ensembles his whole life. All during my growing-up years (and still to this day), he always went around the house singing very goofy songs. I think the one I heard most often had something to do with Paul Bunyan having “funyan” eating an onion. For better or worse, I inherited the silly song gene from him. 😉

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  30. My father’s name is Jerry. One time when I was about 5 we were driving & I told him I could walk home faster than he was driving & he stopped on the side of the road & told me to get out. I cried & begged him not to put me out. He still laughs about that now & I tell my kids that story when they tell me to drive faster.

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  31. My dad’s name is Mike. He is the oldest of 5 kids, and his dad golfed every Saturday his whole life. Because of that, he swore that he wouldn’t touch a golf club until his kids were grown, and by now it’s a little too late. So he goes to the gym compulsively instead now…

    My very favorite memory about Dad is that whenever we were dressed up to go somewhere (church, etc.) or ‘just because’ our blue eyes looked big and blue in those blue jammies, he would say, “Look at that pretty girl! But do you know what the prettiest thing about you is?” And when we would obligingly ask, “What?”, he would say with great gusto and a big hug or kiss, “The girl inside.” This always meant the world to my sister and me, and I think it has helped us always remember that inner beauty far surpasses the fleeting beauty of the exterior.

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  32. Kit-

    I remember Up With People. They came to my high school or junior high, I don’t remember. But I do remember I loved them and thought they were so cool and fun! I wanted to be a part of it, but I can’t sing or dance and I was always too chicken to try anything.

    Happy Father’s Day to my dad, Ralph, Ed, and all the other dads!

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  33. My sweet dad’s name is Ralph. It might seem like a funny name, but it is perfect for him. He turned 70 last year, but look so young, you’d never guess his age. Ever since I can remember, he has had white, white hair. It’s beautiful, and he has always received compliments on it.
    An interesting fact about my dad is that he and two of his brothers had a recording contract while teenagers with Colombia records. They played bluegrass music and were on the radio, too. Later, they traveled the world and then helped to start a musical program called Up With People. My dad is a visionary and I’m so proud of him! Oh, and I think he’s really cute, too.

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  34. My dad’s name is also Ed. Although my cousins call him Uncle Eddie (no one else can call him Eddie). My mom calls him in honey, unless she is aggravated, then she says “Oh, Edward.” It is the only time I hear her say his name. He certainly loves his 4 kids, but he worked long hours, rarely took a vacation, and was somewhat impatient when we were growing up. Boy, do things change with grandchildren. The sun rises and sets on his 12 grandchildren and you can sense the depth of his love when he is near them.

    Fun Factoid: My dad looooves golf. When we were kids my dad would watch golf on TV and make us be quiet whenever someone was putting. My dad never brags and never makes a big deal out of anything (very humble)and never wants a fuss made, even when he was promoted to president of his company. About 10 years ago, after 40 years of golfing, he got a hole in one. That, he made big deal of–sort of–he called each of his kids to tell the story. But you could hear the thrill in his voice.

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  35. My Dad’s name was Marvin. He’s been dead for 29 years (wow, I didn’t realize it had been that long). He wasn’t famous or rich, but at his funeral, when our car was at the top of a bridge on the way to the cemetery we looked back and couldn’t see the end of the funeral procession. So many people have told us since then that he was “the finest man” they’ve ever known. And he taught himself to play the guitar and “fiddle” as he called it. He loved his grandchildren. It’s just sad that they were so young when he died that they don’t remember very much about him.

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  36. My dad’s name is Mike, and he’s part American Indian (enough to look like one). However, he’s always mistaken for Hispanic or Arab. Random Hispanic people come up and talk to him in Spanish (all the time) and he’s always getting hassled at the airport (he travels a lot). He also has “the never-ending” belly button. I know this b/c when I was little I would wait for him to take a nap and then stick my whole pinkie in it. Poor guy.

    Also, he’s the most amazing dad ever!

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  37. My dad’s name is Jack, and he is without a doubt (at least in my mind) the greatest Dad in the whole world. He has always been my biggest supporter.

    Fun factoid: When my dad was in the Air Force, we were stationed in Italy for 2 years. During that time, whenever we went on vacation, my dad would wear his cowboy hat and cowboy boots, and all of the little kids that we saw would call him John Wayne.

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  38. My dad’s first name was Joe (just like my husband’s is now).

    He was born in 1921, and by 1930, had been hit by a car on two separate occasions. My mother used to joke that he was hit by the only two cars that were on the road during those years in Akron, Ohio.

    (He was fine and never seriously injured either time.)

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  39. My dad’s name is , er uh, was Irwin Keller. He passed away this past January. His nickname was Poppy to his grandchilren, Ir to his friends. But to me he was just plain Daddy.

    This is a very hard year for us. Especially holidays. And this being our first Father’s Day without my Daddy – is just the hardest thing for me.

    My dad never was one for games other than gin or blackjack. He loved good music of all genre – and loved to dance. Daddy was so handsome and youthful even at his passing at 71. He got carded sometimes when he asked for senior discounts. You can imagine how he loved that, and my mom hated it.

    I am not sure if he would appreciate a game, but my mom sure would and I would send it to her if I were to win.

    http://www.swirlgirlspearls.blogspot.com

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  40. My dad’s name is Craig. Actually technically that is his middle name, but he has always gone my it. He is most definetely my hero. He had a jerk for a dad, but has managed to truly be the best one I have ever seen (outside my hubby who is giving him a major run for his money).

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  41. My dad’s name is Marvin. He is kind and gentle and unbelievably generous. He also has a will of iron. Once, when I was in elementary school, he was coming home from work and saw a baby bird lying on the sidewalk. It had fallen from its nest, and ants had found it and the ants had eaten out its eyes, and it was still alive. My dad, without hesitation, picked up the baby bird and thwocked its little head against the sidewalk to put it out of its misery. I know that’s kind of a horrible story, but to me it illustrates perfectly one of the things I value so much about my dad, which is that he will ALWAYS do the right thing, no matter how difficult or unpleasant.

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  42. My dad’s name is Richard, but he usually goes by Dick. Three years ago he confessed he’d lived a “double life” for years, and by God’s grace he is now sober from his addiction and living each day in that reality. I’m proud of how far he’s come!

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  43. My dad’s name was Thomas Joseph. He was the original Mr. Mom back in the 70’s. Mom went to work and he retired early and was home all day with us kids. Well he thought he was so clever he would buy generic brands of groceries and put them into the name brand boxes that he would hold onto. Like taking the bag of cereal out of a new box of generic cereal and placing it in the empty box of Frosted Flakes. But we caught on quick. But it gets better. One night while he was serving us dinner, and was clearly on his last nerve, he was scooping mashed potatoes out of the pot and onto my sister’s plate. Well just after he had scooped the potatoes, and just before he placed the potatoes on her plate he decided she didn’t have her chair pulled close enough to the table. So he motioned, rather emphatically for her to pull into the table, with the hand holding the spoonful of mashed potatoes. Well the mashed potatoes flew off the spoon and landed on the wall across the room! It sent us all into peels of laughter. There are so many more stories I could tell about this wonderful man, but I will stop with that! Thanks for the opportunity to retell that memory. My sister’s are coming by tomorrow for a bbq. I will be sure to bring it up with them too!

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  44. My dad’s name was John Lewis, but everyone called him “Jay”. He died when I was only nine, but I can still remember him sitting in his 1970’s orange crushed velvet rocking chair in the living room, reading his newspaper. I lived for the moments when he’d happen to fold the corner of his paper back and jerk his head up at me in a signal to hop up on his lap, which I always did. Thanks to him, I could read well by the time I was in first grade.

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  45. My Dad’s name was Clyde and he led a most unusual life. He quit school after grammar school and worked for four years in a logging camp to help support his family of thirteen. Then, he hitched north and supported himself through high school, college and law school. I took your advice and wrote a blog about him.
    http://www.cookiesoven.blogspot.com Thanks for making me spend so much time thinking about him.

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  46. My dad’s name was Bruce. He died almost 2 years ago from pancreatic cancer. He & I had a love/hate relationship, but now that he’s gone I really try to focus on the “love” … some coworkers & I were talking about the old department store “Woolworths” last week at work, and it reminded me of my dad. He and I for a few years in a row, during my tough teenage years, would go to Woolworths on New Years Day. He’d buy me some new clothes, and we’d just enjoy a good father/daughter day. It’s times like those I miss. His birthday would’ve been ON Father’s Day this year, June 15. I miss you, dad.

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  47. My dad is Jim but went by Jimmy when he was younger (my aunt… his sister… still calls him that). My dad can fix anything. I rarely have to take my car in to have a part replaced or have maintenance done… he does it all. Sames goes for everything around the house. While those are the more “visible” things that he takes care of, his relationship as my loving and caring father is a lot more important to me than those ever will be.

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  48. My dad’s name is Tim. Unfortunately for him, his legal, given name was Timmy. His mother had it changed for him on his 21st birthday … well after all of life’s embarrassing name moments had passed (like the first day of college courses). Maybe that’s where he got his contagious humor and easy laugh!

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  49. My dad’s name is Everett. He’s a doctor in a small town in Montana. He was always really busy when my sister and I were kids, he was one of the only physicians for several miles around. I loved when he called me “sugar bear”. One day I went to visit him at his clinic and imagine my surprise when I heard him call a child patient MY name – Sugar Bear!

    My 4 year old worships the ground he walks on, and my dad is making up for his lost years with my sister and I through my boy. I love to see them together. And he even calls my boy Sugar Bear.

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  50. My dad’s name is Ken. When I was in high school he received a late in life nickname. He was home from Vietnam. My older sister and I had developed a following of boy friends (nothing much with romance for us but they did start to hang out at the house while Daddy was gone. One, a prolific reader, came into the kitchen after being let into the house by the colonel who happens to act and look gruff. “Who’s that guy?” our friend asked. “You know….The guy at the door with the one eyeball in the middle of his forehead?” From that point on daddy signed his cards and all letters, “Cy”.

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  51. My Dad’s name is George. There are lots of interesting things that he does, but one of our favorites is his love of maps and long, meandering, Sunday drives. I bought him a hat several years ago that said “Dad Tours, we’ll get there when we get there”. Oh soooo true! Now I buy him maps for Father’s Day and he is happy as can be. 🙂

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  52. My daddy’s name was Douglas. He loved history of any kind and his hobby was researching our family history. I don’t remember many family vacations that were without a walk through an old cementary. I guess it was kind of like a treasure hunt for us kids…looking for certain names and finding the stones that were overgrown by bushes. I’m almost 60 and I still enjoy walking through old grave yards!

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  53. My dad’s name is Don. When he was growing up they used to call him Moon because he liked to eat moonpies. Nowadays don’t even think about calling him Moon or Donnie. Makes him a little grumpy.

    Angie

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  54. My father’s name was Jewell. Yes, a strange name for a man. My daddy was a really special man. He grew up on a farm in northwestern Missouri during the Depression. Once he shot a hole through the wall into the room where his mother was sleeping, with the pistol he liked to carry with him around the farm. He was a romantic, who loved to read history. But,most of all he was an artist. He could take a piece of paper and a pair of scissors and cut out any animal my mother desired for her Sunday school class freehand. He carved beautiful American eagles and gnarly old trees from wood. Then he went on to create several period dollhouses, in which he carved all the highboys, etc. One of my fondest memories was when we took a watercolor class together. Watercolor was his favorite meduim for the next twenty years. He never made a penny from his art and always dreamed of doing so. He spent all of his working years as an insurance bondsman, supporting his six well loved children and my mom. One day months after he died, while blowing the dust off several collectors edtions of long forgotten authors, I came across an old bible from the 19th century. I opened it and a paper with Daddy’s pen and ink scrawl fell to the floor. He had written that he had left the bible to our older daughter, and how much he loved her. It was dated one week before our other daughter was born. He was such an old romantic. Of course I cried a bucket of tears. I miss him.

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  55. My dad’s name was Frank. He was 40 when I was born. I was 100% daddy’s girl. He could do everything and anything. Every Christmas he would put a can of anchovies in my stocking. “Oh, you don’t like anchovies. I’ll eat them for you” Every year he said that same line. He passed away over 15 years ago when I was only 23. I still miss him every day.

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  56. My father’s name was Don and he was such a picture of contrasts. He grew up on a farm and then a small town, but loved to travel the world. He was very smart, but didn’t go to college. He was in the Army for 24 years and served in Viet Nam in the Green Beret, but was a gentle, loving soul. And he was an amazing father who valued honesty, but found the ability to look surprised every birthday, Christmas and Father’s Day when he opened his gift from me…a box of chocolate covered cherries…his favorite. To this day, I’m not sure if they were really his favorite or mine, but we shared them. And I miss him.

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  57. My Daddy’s name is Quentin. We lived on a farm/ ranch and I would ride around in his pickup to check on the cows, crops and fences. This was long before car seats and safety features. We would bounce along unharnessed and if he put on the brakes a little too fast, his arm would extend like a railroad crossing arm to keep us in place.

    We had cows and horses and some sheep. When I was about 3, my mother’s parents came for a visit. We rode around the land and like all families with children since time beginning, I made the sounds of the animals and named them so that the adults could be entertained by a trained child/ monkey saying horse as sorse and cow as tow. MOOOO etc.

    All was well. Until. We got to the sheep. My sweet, sweet Mimi asked ,” And what are those my lovey??” to which I said…” Those are sons a bitches..”

    My father and his brothers were less than fond of the sheep.

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  58. My Dad’s name is Mike but they called him Mac when he was a bomber pilot in the Air Force.
    Back then he could do a Rubik’s cube as I watched in awe in about ten minutes flat. He was tough, strong, and in my eyes never did a thing wrong.
    Eight years ago my dad was in a car accident that left him with a brain injury that causes cognitive and visual challenges. He’s frailer, he can’t read or quiz me in math anymore but he’s stronger than he ever was in my eyes.
    He makes it through, day after day with the faith of Job fully aware of his condition. He was called young, only in his fifties to allow his daughters and wife to button his shirts to go to church on Sundays, to have his grandkids read to him, to have others drive him to the store. He gives everything that he has to give freely to others. I couldn’t be prouder.

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  59. I can’t share with you my daddy’s first name because the story I’m sharing would then give you his FULL name. And he might not speak to me ever again if I were to do that. My dad has the same name (first and last) of a fairly famous American author.

    Did I mention that English was his worst subject in school and that – to this day – he can barely spell?

    During his college years, one of his English professors used to say, “Ah, the great American author” whenever he saw my father, and then laugh uncontrollably.

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  60. My dad’s name is Gerald, but he usually just goes by Jerry. Not nearly as exciting as “Shorty” but there you have it. My dad is an avid gardener and loves to be outdoors. In their last home, my parents lived on a wooded two-acre lot. In those woods, my dad had created and maintained excellent little winding walking paths. Two little girls lived next door. Their mother would often make them spend the whole day out of the house so she could work, and there weren’t many kids in the neighborhood their age at that time. So they would come over and follow my dad around as he worked in the yard, gardens, and woods. If my dad wasn’t out working, or they couldn’t find him out, they would come and ring the doorbell and ask “Can Jerry come out to play?” My dad always took the time to talk to them, let them help when they seemed interested, taught them how to do certain things, like identifying and pulling weeds (or flowers as was sometimes the case). Their own parents were not the most attentive and I know they really needed an adult in their lives that cared. And I know that my dad needed someone to care about in that way now that his own daughter was grown and out of the house. My parents moved two years ago to a smaller place, now that they’re both retired. But I know he misses his little helpers, and I’m sure he wishes he could hear little voices at the front door asking if he can come out to play. I hope that some day, if I have a little girl, she’ll be able to visit him and follow him around his garden, and learn how to pull weeds and pick flowers with her grandpa.

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  61. My dad’s name is Jonathan. In college, when I drove 12 hours to camp on the beach (without telling my parents, but that’s another story), he told me about the time he and his buddy rode bicycles to Niagra Falls (from Detroit area, I think). His buddy’s girlfriend came along, but she and my dad didn’t get along. They spent the night in a farmers’ field, I think. They made horrible time because of her and when they realized they weren’t going to make it in two days, my dad rode all the way back to Detroit in a day to get their car and pick up the couple. Back in the day when you could talk to strangers, he bummed a ride in the back of a pick up. I was always impressed that my “straigh-laced” dad would do something like that!

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  62. My dad’s name is Charles Thomas, but Charlie Tom to those who, like my 92 year old Granny and 90 year old Gramps, have known him since he was “knee-high to a grasshopper.” Today, Friday, June 13 just happens to be his 39th wedding anniversary to my mom Lillie. And, yes, just like today, they married on Friday the 13th. It just seems to go hand-in-hand with the fact that he popped the question on April Fool’s Day. That’s my dad — sparkle in his eye, love in his heart, and defying the superstitions, just to prove ’em wrong! What a blessed girl I am!

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  63. My dad’s name is Jim. He has the best whistle of anyone I’ve ever heard, and when he gets tickled, it cracks me up, even if I don’t know what he’s laughing about. He always made it clear that there are consequences–good and bad–for every decision one makes, and I’m sorry to say that the part that I sit on suffered the consequences of my decisions fairly often.

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  64. My Dad was named after his father, Roy George. He was the best dad ever and could do anything. When I was little he used to drive to the dairy to get a gallon of milk and take me with him. He’d buy me a nickel ice cream cone and ride around while I ate it. Mind you, this often was right before dinner time. It was always our secret as Mom would have never approved and my three brothers never got invited! I was definitely Daddy’s little girl. He has been gone now almost seven years and I miss him every day.

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  65. I want to play too, even though there is blantant postal discrimination going on here:)
    Should the random number generator pick me (for the VERY first time), give it to number 6. My dad was the 6th of 7 kids.
    My dad’s name is Wes and he loves to goof off. One of my favorite childhood memories comes from lying in bed listening to him laugh at night. It often lulled me to sleep.
    My dad loves kids more than anything and often gives away the ice-cream my mom has bought for them to any and every child that happens to be out playing in their neighborhood.
    When I told him his grandchildren were moving (along with me, but really I am quite secondary now) to be close to him he cried.
    I love that my dad loves my kids so much they make him cry.

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  66. My Dad’s name is Byrd – and amusingly, he’s a III… When he was growing up he was called Byrdie, BT, and Sonny… and he was something of an athlete (played in both the Little League World Series and College Baseball championship)so all of those names appeared in the newspaper. He ended up a blue-collar supervisor – so there were many plays on the Byrd XXX the Third naming. He used to say that when people asked him what the “T” stood for he’d tell them “the trouble you’re gonna be in if you keep asking me that”… he’s a big softy though – he cried the day I left for college and couldn’t go with us when my mom and Aunt took me… Love him a lot!

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  67. My Dads name was Fenton. All my memories of him are from other people. He died when I was 1 and I have no memory of him. But growing up when I would meet people, and they would say ” Oh your Fentons daughter” then they would tell me the most wonderful things about him. I felt I knew him. Thanks to all you folks for sharing him with me.

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  68. My dad’s name is Eugene, but he has always gone by Gene. He didn’t graduate from high school — he had to quit to start working in the family construction business, to help earn money to support his parents and nine siblings — but he is one of the smartest people I know. He worked in this business for more than 50 years, and has built buildings all over North Jersey and New York State. He is the consummate storyteller.

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  69. My dad’s name is Kurt. His father was a German immigrant (also named Kurt) who became an officer with the American forces during WWII. Because of his ethnicity he was assigned to the Pacific Theater(rather than the European Theater) and my father lived in Hawaii as a pre-schooler until the middle of his 3rd grade year. He remembers always preparing for air raid drills and having to hide under the dining room table with a gas mask on his head that was way too big and sleeping with blackout curtains on the windows. He also remembers sunny, breezy days where the water was fine and his father showed films at the little theater at the Schofield Barracks. When Pearl Harbor was attacked, my father, his mother and sister were sent by ship to the mainland as war refugees…headed for the nearest relative, which was an uncle (another immigrant) in Michigan. My grandmother would not take the coats the Red Cross tried to press on her, despite the fact that they didn’t have any and it was WINTER IN MICHIGAN!! My dad spent the rest of his 3rd grade year learning to ice skate and sail in an iceboat his uncle had made.

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  70. My Dad’s name is Bob. He hasn’t been in our lives much since we were very young. A visit here and there. But then 5-6 years ago he got sick. I think it was God’s way of slowing him down. Now he has some form of dementia and lives in a home. However, if you were to meet him you would think he was a normal person. One day 4-5 years ago in church God told me that if anything happens to his current caregiver that I am to take care of him. After a lot of arguing with God because I sure didn’t want to because he didn’t take care of us etc. I agreed (like I had a choice). So if Dad’s caregiver ever can’t keep him he will come from back East and live with us. I haven’t lived with my dad since I was 2, so if the time comes it will be an adventure. I don’t need to win anything just felt good to share. Thanks.

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  71. This is my first time posting or it may be my second time, as I don’t think it went through the first time. Sorry if it did. My dad’s name was Michael – Mike. He was the only one that called me by my given name Victoria. When I was little we got a squirrel monkey. He used to enjoy taking it outside on his shoulder with a leash to show it off. More times than not, the monkey had an accident (no diaper) down his back. I remember laughing so much when that would happen.

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  72. My Dad’s name is Mike and he is a gray-haired, mustached, tattooed, Harley riding, teddy bear of a man. He volunteered to go to Vietnam when he was 19 and his time there is still very much part of his identity.

    Although my parents divorced when I was 11, Dad and Mom were able to remain friends, which was a tremendous blessing for me and my sister. Dad moved to another state for work but he made every effort to visit us at least twice a year, plus call us every week and send letters every once in a while. (This was pre-email days.) When I would visit him in the summers he would take me to baseball games and even took me to see Les Miserables once because he knew I was just a *tad* obsessed with it.

    He’s a great Papa to my children and an excellent father-in-law to my husband, who he challenges at basketball every chance he can get. Now that I am grown, he still comes to visit twice a year and makes special trips for births, graduations, and other important events. Oh, how we all love it when Papa Mike’s big ‘ol truck rolls into the driveway! Of course, my Dad isn’t perfect and we don’t agree on everything, but I love him and am so glad he’s mine.

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  73. My dad’s name is Dan. When he was a child he was called Danny Joe.
    He was born to a frightened, unwed teenager on Christmas Day, 1937. While her family prepared for a holiday breakfast, she lay in her bedroom upstairs, scared, alone and in labor, haven successfully hidden her pregnancy for nine months.
    My father was truly a Christmas gift though, as he soon became the apple of his grandmother’s eye, and he grew up to be a very successful and respected law enforcement official. He is the most honest, dependable and loving man I know. 🙂

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  74. My dad went to Catholic school – the kind where the nuns and brothers locked you in the coat closet for punishment. Only while he was in there, he occupied himself by removing every screw in every hook and shelf, leaving them held up only by years of varnish. This was only discovered the next day when the brothers went to hang up their raincoats.

    His punishment? Being locked in the closet with a screwdriver and a box of new screws until he had every single one put back.

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  75. My dad’s name is Wade. He is a very talkative man and we’ve always joked that he would talk to a fence post. Being talkative has served him well. He was a truck driver for many years and I think he made friends all over the country. Now, he owns his own trucking company and gets to stay at home, working in his office, managing all the trucks. He gets to talk on the phone so much that sometimes he actually gets tired of talking. Who knew!?!

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  76. My dad’s name was LeGette (odd, I know). We were estranged for many years, but I finally caught up with him several years ago by phone. We were able to exchange a letter or two and talk by phone for a couple of months. I was planning a trip to fly to see him when I was notified that he had passed away. So I made the trip anyway, but to plan his funeral, not to visit. I was so relieved that we were able to talk and get past the hurt feelings over the lost years before he passed away.

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  77. My dad’s name is Randy. Growing up I thought he knew everyone in our small town. He used to take me out for breakfast on Saturdays (not every Saturday, just once in a while). It was just me and him (I have a younger sister and brother, too). I thought it was great to go out for breakfast with my dad. One more thing…he loves, loves, loves spending time with his granddaughter (my 17-month-old). She’s his only grandchild so far, and he is a wonderful grandpa. It’s so fun to watch them together!
    Julie

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  78. My father (who will be Daddy forever to me) is Christopher Perry (ourlastname). Here are two facts, the first he would think interesting/important, the second is important to me.

    1. He’s the direct great-great-great-grandson of Commodore Matthew C. Perry, who opened Japan to trade in 1853. He thinks this is especially interesting now that I am living in Japan.

    2. When I was a kid, I was on a summer swim team, and spent most of my waking hours in the pool. I also had VERY long, fine hair. Mom had tons of love and patience for all three of us, but my hair exasperated her. She wanted it cut in a short bob, and have done with it. Dad wasn’t a particularly patient man, but I will never forget sitting on the footstool in front of his armchair as he used a fine-tooth come to carefully and gently pull snarls and mats from my long, wet hair after days of swimming and inconsistent brushing. Every time my hair got terribly tangled that summer, Mom would threaten to just cut out the mats but somehow, Dad found wellsprings of patience and gentleness that I will never, ever forget.

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  79. I don’t want to win the prize, but I will tell you about my dad.

    His name is Terry. He is obsessed with the weather. This would make sense if his livelihood depended on it, but it does not, not any more. However, I love this obsession because it gives him a reason to call and check on us. If he sees a radar showing rain in our area he calls to see if we are getting any and how much. He also loves to call me when he knows I am at a Rangers game and then complain about the noise. I know he just wants to check in and uses things like weather and sports as an excuse. He is great.

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  80. My Dad’s name is Bob. He’s a fantastic storyteller and a natural teacher (he taught high school science for years). Sometimes however, Dad embellishes facts to make them better stories. Once, when we were little, Dad told us to eat our green beans for dinner because if we didn’t, our “poop would explode in our butts”. I’ve never shoveled in green beans so fast in my life!

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  81. My Dad’s name is Kevin. He and my mother married 27 years ago. They met in Korea while he was in the Army and were married 2 months after meeting, despite the language barrier. My father promised my mother that if she said yes to his proposal and moved to America with him, that one day he would bring her back to Korea and they could live there.

    They moved there last July, and my mother hasn’t been happier!

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  82. My dad’s name is Pedro, and he is Hungarian. He’s been on his own since he was sixteen when his mother died. His father was killed in a concentration camp when he was a toddler.

    My favorite memories as a child was sitting on his lap to eat. I remember refusing to eat unless the food came from his plate. I even have a picture of me perched on his knee as we ate breakfast.

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  83. My dad’s name is Bernard Stephan (insert last name here) III. He goes by Steve at home and Bernie at work. When he was a kid he got a tool box for Christmas. His tools were later confiscated by my grandmother after he took all the doorknobs in the house apart, then put them back on loosely so that the doorknob would come off in your hand when you went to open the door.

    Did I mention that he likes practical jokes?!!

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  84. My dad’s name is Raymond, but most people call him Ray. My middle name is Rae, so whenever I think of my name I think of my dad. My dad’s nickname for me though is Willie, although I’m not really sure why, but I kind of like it.

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  85. My dad’s name is Franklin Eugene. It was almost Benjamin Franklin but my grandpa overruled that one. Everyone in his family calls him Butch. Always have. My dad’s favorite breakfast is buckwheat pancakes topped with liverwurst, topped with apple butter. Can you tell he’s from Appalachia?

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  86. My dad’s name is Dwight. When he was 18 years old, he was a gas station attendant. Two burglars came into the station and shot him twice in the stomach. Since he doubled over from the pain, the third shot barely missed his head. He still has those bullets inside him.

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  87. My father’s name is also Ed, and he confuses cliches a little bit. For example, “We’ll burn that bridge when we get to it.” I laughed so hard I almost wet my pants.

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  88. My Dad was Francis (Frank). He was the best dad ever, really. I thought all fathers took their accrued sick leave during the Christmas holidays until I was in the 6th grade! (He did this even through high school and college!) He made french fries from real potatoes on Saturdays while my Mom escaped the house for a while. My brother and I loved it when he stayed home with us. When we were in college, Dad made the best pina coladas ever using ingredients brought home from an assignment in Puerto Rico. I love him so much and miss him every day (he passed away in 2005). Thanks for the stories and the opportunty to share.

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  89. My dad’s name is Mike. When I was sick as a kid, he would always make me milkshakes. Once, when I was in highschool and it was clear I would be sick and home alone for a long time, he bought me a tape of Top Gun. To my knowledge, it is the only movie he has ever purchased to date.

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  90. My dad is John.

    My dad and his older brother shot all the heirloom, handblown, brought-over-from-the Old Country glass ornaments on their Christmas tree with their new BB guns when they were 10 and 8 years old. My grandparents were at a party.

    He was so naughty!

    My grandma told the most eye-popping, sometimes hilarious stories about my dad and his six siblings. Those stories are one of the reasons I wanted a big, boisterous family. Not that I want my kids to jump off the roof using bed sheet parachutes.

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  91. My dad’s name is Gary and he is still with us, evening though we know time is short.

    My most treasured memory of him will always be the way he wrapped Christmas presents when I was a kid. He would wrap the gift in a brown paper sack, cut it to fit the package, then he would draw something on the package, such as Holly Hobby or another character. He was quite a good artist, but that is the only time he ever drew anything for us. When cleaning out my parent’s house, I found one drawing my mom had saved. That is such a treasured part of my childhood.

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  92. My daddy goes by his middle name, David. Dad spends all his time in the garage tinkering with the cars. Since my parents were divorced, I spent every other weekend in the garage with him. I’d fetch tools and bore him with my teenage dramas. Today, I’m the resident mechanic of our household, thanks to my Dad!

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  93. My dad’s name is Ben. Actually his given name is Bennie Lee. His family says it Bennilee, all run together. When he was in First Grade he decided he didn’t want to be Bennie or Ben, so he changed his name to Fred. Only for first grade, then he returned to Bennie.

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  94. I got that game for my niece when she was in the hospital for a few days. It was a huge hit!

    My dad’s name is Myron. When I was expecting my son I jokingly told Dad we were considering the name Myron. He was horrified and said we shouldn’t do that to his grandson.
    My granny didn’t think that was amusing AT ALL!
    She says Myron is a nice name.

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  95. My dad’s name is David and he is the best dad! When he was little he told me he and his sister were home alone and he wanted to fix something for them to eat. He had always heard if you needed help to call information. So he picked up the phone and heard, “operator, can I help you?” He asked this lady how to make biscuits over the phone and she told him, helping him thru each step. He even called her once with a math problem and she helped him with that too.
    And….. when I was a little girl I had very long hair. He would wash it for me at night and then brush it as he had the hair dryer going…getting me ready for bed. I am so thankful for my dad!

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  96. Marc(Marcus) is his name. And you better not try to spell it with a K! 🙂

    He has owned his own company since before I was born, and my mother was a teacher. He drove me to school every day until high school because I hated to take the bus, and on the way we’d stop at McDonalds to share a coke and breakfast for $2.02. When I was sick at school he always brought me medicine or picked me up because its hard for teachers to just leave on a whim. One day the school nurse pulled him aside and asked if I had a mother… I have a lovely mother, but I also have one amazing daddy.

    My husband and I both work for his company now. And so does my brother, and my brother in law. I guess you could say hes a great boss as well!

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  97. My dad’s name is Norman. He always told us stories about how he was so poor when he was growing up that they lived in the basement of the outhouse! Okay, I think he may have been joking about that one. I keep finding out interesting facts about my dad. For instance, just last month he got peaved at my mom because when she was at a garage sale she passed up a good deal on a unicycle. Evidently he has always wanted to learn how to ride a unicycle. My dad will be 70 this year!

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  98. My dad’s name was Scott, and he was one of the most personable people you could ever meet. He just had a way of making people comfortable enough to open up, no matter what the circumstance.

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  99. My dad’s name is Scott. He is hysterically funny and a great story-teller. I love hearing the stories about when he was young and not-so-bright, because he gets this mostly-proud, a little-embarrassed tone when he tells them. For instance, one summer night, after hanging out in an empty pasture with friends and drinking a few beers, Dad and his friends decided it would be really fun to pee on an electric livestock fence…

    They didn’t know it was on, they claim.

    I can promise you they never did that again, though!

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  100. My dad’s name is James, but everyone calls him Jim besides his mother who still uses James. Dad spent two years in a volunteer program in the early 70s and during that time lived with Roy Chasez, who eventually married and adopted a son named J.C. who became a member of ‘N Sync. Do I really want to claim that connection???

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  101. My Dad’s name is Chris. He is a little crazy…ok a lot crazy. When I was a really little girl he used to tie a towel to his neck and run around his room in his tighties yelling, “SUUUUUPER DAAAAD!” Though he hasn’t done that particular antic for a really long time, he is still just as crazy. That is one of the reasons I love him so much!

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  102. My dad’s name was Perry Warren, and we’re considering naming our soon-to-be second child Grant Warren. Dad owned and ran a bulldozer, and when I was a child, my mom & I were always traipsing around after him helping him with his bulldozer business. Anyone else know how to fuel up and oil a DC-7?? 🙂

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  103. I would love one of these games for our family! My dad would play it too!
    The man that I call my dad is really my stepfather. When I was 3, he and my mom got married and he took to me like I was his own flesh and blood. While we have had our ups and downs (the downs being mainly during the teenage years) he is the best dad that I could ever have. He is also a master fix it kind of guy. I’ve never seen him approach something that he can’t fix, eventually!

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  104. My dad’s name is Mike, even though Max is on his birth certificate and legal documents — he will tell you that is a pain in the neck of a way to go through life for as much medical personnel he has had to deal with.

    He is a real estate agent that rides a Harley-Davidson, still lives in the town where he grew up and graduated high school where he was “Mr. High School” so he knows pretty much everyone in town (it’s a little larger than Tuna, but not by much!) He loves to make people laugh. He’s the best…

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  105. My dad is Robert Lee. He goes by Robert most of the time now, but at work he was always Bob. He is the smartest person I know.
    His family lived by the school in the community where he started school so they let him start when he was 4-years-old. He was doing so well in school that later he skipped a grade (2nd maybe?). Anyway he graduated from high school at 16. He used to read the dictionary for entertainment. Seriously. He was the first one in his family to graduate from college.
    He has so many health issues I can’t name them all, but you would never guess it by looking at him.
    He is a little grumpy and intimidating at times, but little kids and dogs love him!

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  106. My dad’s name was Ron. He died almost 2 months ago. He was very tight with is money and we all laughed about this; he laughed at himself about it. Among the notes and instructions he left for my brother before he died were directions about what to do with his beloved Mustang – “Mustang is to be sold at cash value when Marilyn is ready. NO DEAL FOR FAMILY!!!” We (us four kids) are thinking of getting t-shirts made that say NO DEALS FOR FAMILY and having our picture taken in them for Marilyn (our step mother) because it is now our tag line.
    Dad would be glad to hear us laughing because he had a fantastic sense of humor.

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  107. My Dad’s name is Dave, and he’s retired from a career as an Air Force officer. He’s very mild-mannered, and to look at him one would never guess that he has travelled all over the world, to 5 different continents, in peace and wartime, to train our troops in transportation logistics. I have a soft spot for heroes. 🙂

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  108. Oh, we’d love to have that one. I’m sure I’m not smarter than one either, but I could play that better than Pac-man or the cube too.

    My dad’s name is Don and he can talk like a duck so well that he’s been knighted Grandpa Duck since the time my kids could talk.

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  109. My dad’s name is Billy Gene and he tells the best stories even if I’ve heard them seven hundred sixty seven times. When asked what he was going to do when he retired after 30 plus years his response was, “Absolutely Nothing”

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  110. My dad’s name was Duane Hugh Hulet. He was the oldest of seven kids and bought his parents the first car they ever had. He had a job from the time he was 12, and worked all the time. One cold winter Sunday he was sick (a real rarity for him!) and he stayed home from church (unheard of). When we got home, I found he had spent the entire morning in the garage, building me a sled. He just didn’t know how to lay down!

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  111. My dad’s name is Renato Antonio. On his first day of school they called his name for attendance but he didn’t raise his hand. At the end of the roll call the teacher asked if there was anyone who’s name hadn’t been called. My father raised his hand. The teacher asked him – are you Renato? He said – No, my name is Fatso. It was a one room school so they asked his brother Roberto. Is this your brother? Is his name Renato? No, his name is Fatso! One brother and one sister later his sister Hilda (your old neighbor) remembered that Fatso was not his name.

    When he joined the service during WWII he had guard duty and all the soldiers were introducing themselves. My dad said – My name is Renato. The other soldiers said – We’ll never remember that. We’ll call you Joe. And Joe he still is to all his Army buddies.

    He is also called Renat, Natti, Not, Pop and Dad but never Fatso anymore. AM – you can imagine how skinny his brothers were if they called my dad “Fatso”.

    Happy Father’s Day to AD.

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  112. My Dad’s name is Tommy, Charles Thomas technically. We weren’t close when I was young, he worked ALOT. It’s taken me getting older to appreciate how his work ethics and long hours away from us was so benefitial even today and helped mold me into a better person. When he walked me down the aisle at my wedding, he raised my veil and said “we shoulda done this in Gatlinburg”, what sentimental words of wisdom, the crazy man! He was nervous as heck to be in front of hundreds of friends and family and had hoped for a small wedding, just family, in the mountains. We’re super close now, we’re spending a day just us at the lake every Friday on the boat this summer. I’m headed there in minutes AND… he answered a prayer when he came to us and volunteered to help us fund our plans for adoption. He rocks, I love him and I’m blessed!!

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  113. Unfortunately, my dad was more sperm doner than father, however, my mom married a wonderful man when I was 26 that loves me and my children as his own. He LOVES to travel but hates to travel – if that makes sense. In other words, don’t talk to him until you get to your destination or you’ll meet a cranky guy!

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  114. My dad’s name was John.
    He always wanted a dog when he was a little boy and my grandparents didn’t let him have one. My grandmother decided that she wanted him to take dance lessons and he absolutely refused to. Until she told him that if he did, the dog was his. He did and he got a boxer named Jigs, who used to ride in the front seat of his car when he was a teenager.

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  115. My dad’s name is Mike. My middle name is Michele, after him. He’s pushing 60 but the most active almost 60 year old you’ll ever meet. Unless he just got done playing golf, because then it’s time to watch more golf on TV while taking a nap.

    We used to go on looooong (torturous) bike rides in the country. It was a good bonding experience, but my teenage prissy self hated it. The most embarrassing part was when he’d shoot snot rockets out of his nose because who needs to bring tissue when you’re riding a bike in the country?

    I wouldn’t ask for another though ~ he’s an awesome dad and an even better grandpa.

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  116. My husband’s name is Donald. When my 18 month old God son came to visit the other day, instead of calling him Uncle Donald, he started calling him “Duck”. It was so cute and totally unprompted. I don’t know if it will stick though.
    BTW, my 7 year old DD LOVES “are you smarter than a fifth grader!”
    My dad is awesome also and his name is Charlie. We go to lunch every week.

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  117. My Dad’s name is Leroy. It is cute because my oldest daughter who just turned 8 yesterday-6 days after my Dad’s birthday, started calling him grandpa RoyLe when she was old enough she could talk. The name has stuck and that is what we all call him now even my youngest daughter who it 6. My due date with my oldest, Emma, was June 4th. My Dad’s birthday is June 6th. He just new(hopeful)that his granddaughter would be born on his birthday. I think he was a little disappointed when she was not but thankful she arrived safely and healthy. My Dad is so kind…he shares the produce from his garden with the elderly in my hometown & the poor. He doesn’t know a stranger that is for sure. He was always the last to leave on Sunday mornings after church because he would be talking to everyone. My Mom, brother and I would be sitting in the car waiting for him. I did not inherit his gift of gabbing but often wish it came as naturally to me as it does him. I am very proud of my Dad. We did not grow up financially rich but we were rich in my eyes. My home was always full of love and support. I am thankful for that. I am very blessed to have a Dad who taught us the importance of having a relationship with our Lord Jesus Christ! Sorry…I got a little windy. 🙂 Jennifer C. rjcouch@hotmail.com

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  118. My dad’s name is Ronnie Howard (Ron to my mom and most friends and family)…….. And no he is not THE Ronnie Howard! For some reason my mom and dad named my brother the same name. You can imagine them both being called Opi. I was even doubet Aunt Bee! I Have no idea why… Needless to say it was interesting growing up with two men with a famus persons name. Thank God it was’nt some serial killers name!

    Happy Fathers Day all.. 🙂

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  119. My dad’s name is Dan. He sells eggs and he wears bib overalls every day of his life. Even to church.

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  120. Hi, my dad’s name is Alfred (Freddie to his family, Al to my mom’s). My son was telling a friend about his “Tata” before he met him, and told him “My Tata is funny, he calls poop “oopie-doop”. I had to crack up, Daddy has called poop oopie-doop for as long as i can remember!

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  121. My dad’s name is Buford and when I was a kid he could wiggle both ears. After having ear surgery, he can now wiggle only one, to the delight of his grandchildren.

    Gramps attends every ball game and school event, without fail.

    He’s the best. Period.

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  122. My Dad is Chuck or Charlie or Charles, depending on who introduced you to him and/or how he felt like introducing himself that day.

    A not so fun, but interesting story about my dad. In 1996 he was working on my parents home and fell off the scaffolding (at least that is what we all assume) and hit his head on the concrete porch. He was staggering across the yard when my mom found him. He ended up in a coma for 3 days and when he awoke was almost total coherant immediately. He went home about 2 days later and at his 2 week check up they told him to just come back if he ever needed to again…no further therapy or check ups needed. The doctors still do not know how his brain healed so fast, but we are grateful for miracles! The residual effects were odd…immediately he had a tendancy to make things up, but that has now disappeared; he would get headaches sometimes, those are also better; he lost his sense of smell which caused a loss of sense of taste. In fact, some tastes like chocolate and mint became awful for him…boy we were bummed that he always passed those things off to us! He has now gotten back a fair amount of his sense of taste and some of the sense of smell, which means less chocolate for us. Again, we are just so grateful for his recovery!

    heather@pagesbyheather.com

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  123. Jack R. and he use to sign my report cards, remember when
    parents had to sign report cards and send them back to school? He would sign mine Jack Rabbit. He also signed anything else Jack Rabbit if he thought it might embarass us. He was a delightful father of four girls and often said, “I’m a Jack living with five Queens.”? He treated us like Queens, miss you Dad, sending hugs to heaven for you.

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  124. Um, well, okay, his name was Bill. I don’t have the best memories of him though. I do recall, however, one day I saw a Burger King commerical advertising some sort of prize with a meal (this was a LONG time ago, like late seventies or early eighties, so I’m not sure they actually had happy meals back then). Anyway, I wanted this prize so when his weekend came to visit me, he drove me all over town trying to get that prize. Unfortunately our BKs had not received the promotional trinkets yet, but he kept trying….restaurant after restaurant after restaurant. I need to remember that particual memory more than the other ones I do…

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  125. My dad’s name is Ronnie. He was always super involved with everything I was into as a kid. I cheered from age 4-16 and he always took me to practice and helped out the team in any way that he could. Every year there was awards banquet at the end of the season. There was an award for most involved mom. There was never an award for most involved dad. My daddy won the most involved mom award 2 or 3 years in a row. And he was as proud as he could be to get it!

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  126. My dad’s name is Joe. He was 37 and tired by the time I was born. He and my mom met at college, where he went on to obtain several post-grad degrees in psychology.

    One night, my mother was being slowly driven insane by my sister playing Julio Iglesias records over and over in her room at one end of the hall and me playing hard rock at top volume at my end of the hall. She said, “Joe, you’re the psychologist; DO SOMETHING OR I’M GOING TO KILL THEM!”

    So, my dad went to the door of the den, which opened into the hall about halfway between my sister’s room and mine and screamed, “Y’all turn that #*$& off!” and slammed the door so hard the foundation shook.

    Whenever anyone mentions therapy, I tell them I’ve had one session…and it scared the pants off me.

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  127. My dad is the youngest of seven kids. He was born on election day in 1924. Guess who was elected president on that day? Calvin Coolidge. Yep my dad was named after the president. I guess they were tired of thinking up names after 4 boys and 2 girls so they named him after the president. He is a great dad and granddad. I remember learning to ride a two wheeler when he was off from work after he broke his wrist. Years later, we found out that his wrist didn’t heal correctly. Possibly from holding up a bicycyle for somebody. He helped both my sons learn to ride a bike too. I had the same can’t breath moment you had at the ER the other morning with my youngest son. We are going in for more tests in July. This would be a perfect game for him.

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  128. My dad’s name is Charlie. He served in the military for 22 years. He’s one of those guys who’s never met a stranger. He loves to laugh and is more or less still a big kid.

    One of my favorite (and it wasn’t funny at the time) stories about him is about my very first date. I was a freshman in high school and headed to the homecoming dance. My date drove up in a beautiful old Ford Fairlane and there’s my dad…sitting on the front porch cleaning his shotgun.

    Unfortunately for my dad, he couldn’t keep up the charade for too long because he started laughing at the look on my date’s face as he slowly walked up the front walk.

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  129. My dad’s name is Henry. Growing up in rural upstate New York, he was on every sports team in highschool. Not only was he very athletic, but his school was so small that they needed all the boys that they could get on their team!

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  130. I love my dad and his name is Tom.

    People who know my dad from different places call him different names. People who have known him from chidlhood call him Tommy, people who know him as an adult call him Tom, and people he worked with (he retired after over 40 years with the same company) call him Tom Tom.

    He’s the best dad and I love him!

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  131. Well, my Dad’s name is Ed, too! Although no one would ever call him Shorty, as he is 6 feet tall. My dad is a root beer lover, and his favorite chip dip (the only one he’ll eat) is french onion dip made with Lipton Onion Soup mix, cream cheese and milk – mixed to a smooth consistency. It really is much better than mixing the soup with sour cream – I’ll give him that one!

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  132. My dad’s name is Wayne LeRoy. He was the hardest working man I’d ever met. He worked for the city and by that I don’t mean he sat in a cushy office pushing papers. He was outside clearing and repairing streets and sewers. In Iowa. Rain, snow, sleet, hail, blistering heat, blizzards, just like the mailman. He did that for 35 years before he took early retirement with disability. He has Parkinson’s disease. Now he sits on the couch and watches TV. But, he LOVES his grandchildren. He’s got a whole mess o’youngun’s. And they love their Papa. If we’ve got a colicky baby, we give it to him and within minutes he’s got that baby snuggled up on his chest fast asleep.

    Gotta love someone who can calm a baby with colic

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  133. Wilmer. How’s that for a name to carry around your whole life? He went by “Bill”. His sister Elmira went by “Cathy”. What was my grandmother thinking?

    Dad was an incredible father. Really loved us unconditionally and we knew it every day. He was an amazing musician – taught orchestra and band and could play every instrument in the orchestra. Amazing. He moved to heaven 18 years ago when I was 32.

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  134. My Dad’s name is David Joseph, his brother’s name was Joseph David and their father was Joseph David. My parents of course named my brother Joseph David and the madness continues…..

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  135. My dad’s name is David but everyone calls him Red… everyone except my grandma I think!

    Obviously he has red hair and my oldest daughter inherited that – they’re the only two in our immediate family with red hair and they’re like two peas in a pod.

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  136. My dad’s name is Chris. He was the drum major his senior year of high school and learned to twirl a baton at band camp. At the first home football game he waltzed across the field twirling the baton, much to his director’s surprise!!

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  137. My dad’s name is Jay, and he’s a doctor. Must be where I get my love of science. 🙂 My favorite story is one his mom tells us. When he was about ten, she opened her freezer to find a white lab rat frozen in there. Despite the fact that he had a brother, she immediately yelled for him to come get his rat out of the freezer. He couldn’t figure out how she knew it was him, but she says it was because he was always doing stuff like that. 🙂

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  138. My Daddy’s name was Frederick. He never yelled at me when he found out that I raced a guy in my class for pink slips. I won but the other guy wouldn’t give me his car. Oh, did I mention I was driving Daddy’s truck that day? LOL

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  139. My dad’s name is Ed also. HE’s a slow talking, slow walking New Yorker (imagine that?) married to a fast talking, fast walking Southern gal. My mom says Dad married her when I was six and my sister five years old because “He couldn’t stand the idea of you two girls growing up without a father.” (My father had died when I was two….) He’s been a wonderful dad to both of us, and the brother that came along a couple of years later. My dad never showed favoritism. Or rather, he showed favortism to all three of us because each one of us thinks we are his favorite child. That’s a feeling to hold on to.

    Dad is 68 years old and he plays softball in an “Over 60” league, traveling to tournaments during the summer and fall in their 35 foot trailer. He’s been named “Recycler of the Year” in their town and works at their church’s thrift shop and food pantry each week. I sure hope I have his energy and stamina when I’m 68!

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  140. My dad, John, was a lifeguard in Ocean City, MD, and taught Debbie Reynolds to waterski for some movie she was in. I always thought he had a cool pre-parent life – my memories of him are totally tied up in his IBM businessman persona.

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  141. My dad’s name is George. His middle name is Washington. I’m not kidding. And no, he wasn’t named after the president, he was named after my grandfather. I think he was named after the president.

    My dad goes by G.W. Wouldn’t you?

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  142. My dad’s name is Paul – really Paul-Andre (how do I do that accent-thing?). In his youth, he was a big, bad motorcycle boy, until he met my wanna-be-a-nun mom and she straightened him out. I love looking at the pictures of him from those days though, he looks so James Dean!

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  143. My dad’s name was Earl Thomas, but his sisters and brothers called him Sonny. When I was a teenager I liked a band called The Beau Brummels and when my dad heard them he grumbled about how horrible they sounded, so we started called him Beau Grumble and then shortened it to Beau. He remained Beau until he died, even his grandchildren called him Beau. Love reading your blog!!

    Like

  144. My dad’s name is Jim. We called him “Big Jim” because my brother was a junior. Now that my brother towers over my dad, he’s still “Big Jim.” I just called him Dad, he called me his “nar nar fizzle tail.” He still does. And I still call him every week to apologize for all that I put him through. Just yesterday, in fact, I told him yet again. And that I love him.

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  145. My dad’s name was Marc and he was the perfect dad and grandpa. In fact, when I was seven years old my friend was over at my house playing and we had just made lunch for ourselves. My dad was out working in the yard and he came into the house for a minute and talked with us. After he went back outside my friend said, “I wish your dad was my dad.” At the time I didn’t think much of it, but years later I realized how sad it was for her because her dad really was a jerk.

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  146. My Dad’s name is Berthold Herbert Jr. (it’s a Junior thing). He goes by Herb.

    And he decided to name his only son Herbert Edwin (and he goes by Ed). That’s the interesting factoid.

    And he’s a GREAT dad!

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  147. My dad’s name was Walter, but he hated it, so when he was 21 years old, he had it legally changed to the letter “W”, and went by his middle name instead.

    One of my favorite stories–while I was in nursing school and had had a particularly rough week, he came and got me and took me to The Luau, a Polynesian restaurant, for lunch one day and told me to order anything I wanted. And we did the flaming dessert, too.
    Daddy had a lot of faults, but since it’s been 27 years since he died, I can mostly remember the good things now.

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  148. My dad’s name is Mike. When I was in high school, my sister had already married and left and my mom worked a lot (traveled a lot), so it was just me and dad a lot of the time. On Fridays he would take me to Braum’s (oh, how I wish there was a Braum’s in St. Louis!) and we would split a banana split together. Just about every week.

    Hmmm – maybe I need to go to Oklahoma tomorrow and see if he wants some ice cream…

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  149. My Daddy’s name was George Franklin Cook — after George Washington and Benjamin Franklin. He never invented anything or became President, but I loved him anyway.

    Sign me up, please. I suppose if I find I’m dumber than a 5th grader I can always pass it on to someone else.

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  150. My dad’s name is Nat. When we were growing up he would save the soap slivers (you know, the tiny part left over that you can’t even hold onto) in a cup in his medicine cabinet. When the cup got pretty full he would melt down the soap and fashion it into a new bar. The color was not pretty. We all refused to use the recycled soap. It was a lot of effort for a 57 cent bar of soap.

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  151. My Dad’s name is Joe. When he was a boy he saw a telephone repairman get electrocuted in a thunder storm – OK, so maybe that wasn’t very funny but we loved to hear the story when we were kids. Funny one – each year my dad would give up watermelon for lent; funny for 2 reasons – 1 It’s not in season during lent and 2 He hates watermelon.

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  152. What fun!

    My dad’s name was Walter Othel ——. I know. Poor guy. Can you imagine going through life with a name like Walter Othel? Oddly enough, he never seemed bothered by that name.

    This isn’t a fun fact, in that it isn’t funny, but it is neat. My dad had an aritifical leg, as a result of an on-the-job accident when he was 20. Most people were shocked to discover that fact, as he never let it slow him down. He taught us four kids to water ski, though he’d never ski’d (skiid?) a day in his life. Actually, he taught us all kinds of things. He’s been gone 5 years now, and I sure do miss him. 😦

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